Being a newly eggless baker, finding good egg substitutes for your baked goods at home can be an overwhelming task. Well, fret no more! Here is a bit of clarity and guidance to help you understand what egg substitutes are out there and what type of baked good it can best be substituted into. 

I choose not to use eggs when I bake purely based on a preferential stance. Mainly the smell. I have a really difficult time enduring the smell of eggs that is left over not only in the bowls and sink but also the odor it can emit in some baked goods. If I can smell or taste it, it grosses me out and I can’t finish it. I’m not really sure when this began for me but it definitely got worse in the past 2 years to the point where I just refuse to bake with them.  Paired with my dairy allergy, I tend to unintentionally fall into the “vegan” category in the kitchen.

Guide to Egg Substitutes - Fork & Beans

We all have our personal reasons why we each started this eggless journey. Whether you are allergic, have difficulty digesting, are morally against, or have an unexplainable repulsion towards the smell of eggs like I do, we all have questions and need a place to start.  Especially for the new traveler, help is greatly needed to map out what exactly are good egg substitutes and which ones work best for certain baked goods. So let’s not waste anymore time and get to uncracking egg substitutes, shall we? 

Guide to Egg Substitutions - Fork & Beans

Here is a list of all my personal favorite egg substitutes when I bake.  I have dabbled with all of the below mentioned but there are a few that I am more experienced with because I have found more favorable results in the kitchen. I will discuss this further down in the post but for the time-being, here is a comprehensive, though not limited to, guide on the types of egg substitutes that are out there:

Guide to Egg Substitutions - Fork & Beans 

Guide to Egg Substitutions - Fork & Beans

Egg substitution is fairly simple. Each item listed below is an easy go-to measurement for replacing 1 egg for a recipe. If the recipe calls for 2 eggs, simply double the amount.  Please note that not every item listed should be substituted in every situation. Part of the journey is researching and having an appetite for knowledge. It’s empowering, I promise, despite how overwhelming it may seem. Get to know these items and start experimenting in your own kitchen. You might find a different preference than what I have…and that is the beauty of individuality.

Guide to Egg Substitutes - Fork & Beans

Each item has its own purpose and role in a certain type of baked good. For example, if I am looking for a crunchier cookie, I am going to opt for an item that will harden the cookie, like a starch (EnerG would work great here) would do the trick. The opposite would be quite true: If I am trying to create a chewier cookie,  I would opt for a fruit puree like applesauce or even pumpkin puree since these create a moist, tender bite.

I would not recommend using a flax egg for a cake because flaxseed meal does not do a whole lot for leavening a recipe. Instead I would look to EnerG, “Buttermilk” mixed with baking soda, and/or chia seeds.  Again, personal preference. Here is what I have found to work best in certain types of baked goods:

Guide to Egg Substitutions - Fork & Beans

*Please note that this list is not the last word on the matter. This is simply my own interpretation of eggless baking that I have grown to understand over the past couple of years. There will always be new items to be added here as well as current items that I have omitted because I do not have experience using them. I believe that I cannot be a resource to you if I have no idea what I am talking about so I have limited the list to what I do know. I hope this proves to help you in the beginning steps to becoming an eggless baker.

So what are we waiting for? Let’s start baking and see what kind of eggless goodies we can create!

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